Watershed Resilience

Watershed resiliency has become a hot topic following the 2012 wildfires and 2013 flood in Colorado. The term resilience is defined as "the ability to recover quickly following a disturbance." When our watersheds are more resilient, they are better prepared to rebound following future floods and fires.

Our watershed resiliency work is multi-disciplinary in nature and is based on work from a variety of fields of science including ecology, hydrology and geomorphology. Our strategy is to reduce the risk of high severity wildfire, reduce flooding risk, and improve habitat and river corridor function.

 
 
uppper poudre plan.JPG

Resilience plans 

Funding from the Community Development Block Grant- Disaster Recovery program administered by the Colorado Department of Local Affairs allowed us to complete both our Upper and Lower Poudre Resiliency Plans. 


Ways to improve watershed resiliency 

  • Increase floodplain function

  • Improve sediment transport throughout the river system

  • Reduce risk of high severity wildfire via thinning trees, pile burning and prescribed (broadcast) fire

  • Improve/increase riparian corridor habitat

  • Consider project areas that will protect important infrastructure and protect water quality (communities, roads/bridges, water supply)

 

 Pile burning at the Scout Ranch for our Elkhorn Creek Forest Health Initiative partner project.

Pile burning at the Scout Ranch for our Elkhorn Creek Forest Health Initiative partner project.